Botoxology 101

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There’s no mistaking that I have wrinkles in my forehand, laugh lines at the corners of my eyes and around my mouth, but they are the least of my worries in this temporary shell of a body I live in here.  So it is not to satisfy my vanity that I endured needle pokes for the possible positive effects of Botox, but for better mobility and comfort.  I’ve learned some things through this experience.

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Needles are always intimidating.  They are a marvelous invention that administer the prevention and healing of many medicines in a multitude of ways, but no one relishes the temporary pain felt to get the medicine where it must be to offer its benefit.  I, myself, would have thought I had overcome needle phobia after all of my immunizations, blood draws and 15 years of self-injecting, but this was new territory.

Weighing pros and cons is always helpful.  The extreme stiffness that MS introduced into my life had steadily increased over the years to the point where the magic of oral medication can no longer work effectively on its own.  With the reassurance of two doctors and a physical therapist, I was finally ready to try something new.  So, while I felt trepidation about this treatment, I overcame my fear and am hoping the longer advantages will far outweigh the short discomfort I felt.

Trusting your doctor helps.  I’m glad my doc realized how bad my spasticity is and didn’t limit options.  When the target increases, so must the ammunition. He referred me to another doc who specializes in these issues.  When I expressed concern about the possibility of it working too well, she lowered the dose; but now I’m wondering if results will be minimal, if any, because of that. Seeing and hearing my anxiety, the doctor also used a pediatric needle and I was grateful for that.  Getting my uncooperative body in position for the treatment was half the battle.  It’s an interesting science.  An ultrasound device was used to measure muscle tone to aid in determining where to inject. The needles, guided by an experienced professional, were introduced into muscles that need taming.  I had four shots, three in the inner thighs and one on the inside of a calf.  I had imagined the worst.  And it wasn’t that bad.  It was manageable.

Patience is important.  Since injecting Botox weakens muscle, I had concerns about my legs becoming too loose.  So far, that hasn’t happened.  Somehow, in my research, I didn’t learn that the effects may take two to four weeks.

So I wait.

Anyone out there who is willing to share his/her experience?  Did it work for you?

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About Climbing Downhill

Wife and mother of grown kids, in my 50's and dealing with MS, making life's moments count and trying to offer something of value to others along the way. https://climbingdownhill.wordpress.com
This entry was posted in MS/Multiple Sclerosis and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

13 Responses to Botoxology 101

  1. Rob says:

    I’ve heard of Botox being used for bladder control. However being used for muscle relaxation in the legs is something new to me. Interesting how treatments we have available are being used in different ways. Like to hear how your progress goes.

    • Thanks for commenting Rob. I’m glad my doc realized how bad my spasticity is and didn’t limit options. He referred me to another doc who specializes in these issues. She lowered the dose when I expressed concern about the possibility of it working too well, but now I’m wondering if results will be minimal, if any, because of that. It’s an interesting science. An ultrasound device was used to measure muscle tone to aid in determining where to inject. I’m thinking this is information should have been included in my post, so I may edit. Glad you got me to think of it. Will try to post an update.

  2. Declan Groeger says:

    Likewise I had never heard of Botox and muscle issues. I hope it works for you.

  3. patbaker@stny.rr.com says:

    You are braver than I am!

  4. chmjr2 says:

    All the best. I will say a few prayers.

  5. You will LOVE botox!
    I have been getting botox injections in my legs for several years now. Nothing helps me to manage my extreme spasticity better (besides stretching & exercise!). It lasts about 3 months. You will be able to tell when you are due for another session! I have never had a bad reaction or anything. Yes, like every treatment, botox is expensive, but the results have been well worth it.
    I’m due for my next treatment on June 30th and actually look forward to it!
    Let us know what you think. If you have any Q’s or concerns, feel free to email me at myoddsock@gmail.com
    Best!
    Doug

  6. Cath says:

    Good for you! I too had similar treatment. My physician used Phenol. He used tiny electric shock impulses (EMG type) to find the location of nerves to be injected. He explained the Phenol acts by destroying the nerve pathways that are involved with spasticity of troubled muscles. Results are immediate after treatment and last up to 12 months. For me, he felt I needed a stronger med for results. For the first time in years, I had heel-toe gait action! You can count on daily prayers to improvement! 🙂

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